Doc Bruce watched over night snorkelers from his stand up paddleboard. 

Doc Bruce watched over night snorkelers from his stand up paddleboard. 

Sanibel Sea School’s Mighty Calusa Week campers celebrated the history and culture of Southwest Florida’s Calusa Indians. In addition to canoeing, fishing, and building tools like the Calusa might have, participants showed their Sanibel spirit in the Fourth of July parade and were invited to attend a night snorkel.

Snorkelers found shrimp, juvenile crabs, and more. 

Snorkelers found shrimp, juvenile crabs, and more. 

The ocean becomes a different place at night, and it’s amazing what you can find with an underwater flashlight and a snorkel mask after dark. Campers met on the Sanibel Causeway at sunset and ventured into the seagrass beds with their counselors in search of nocturnal sea creatures.

Mighty Calusa Week Campers seined for fish like the Calusa Indians.

Mighty Calusa Week Campers seined for fish like the Calusa Indians.

“Campers are usually a little bit nervous at first, but they quickly realize how much there is to see and forget about their fears,” said Nicole Finnicum, the organization’s Director of Education. “This week, night snorkelers found shrimp, hermit crabs, juvenile blue crabs, pin fish, and mojarra.” Some of the snorkelers were also able to observe bioluminescence, which is the production of light by living organisms.

We ended the week with an exciting surf paddling race.

We ended the week with an exciting surf paddling race.

As usual, participants also surfed, created ocean art using natural materials, and made plenty of new friends. Sanibel Sea School is a 501c3 nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the ocean’s future, one person at a time. To learn more, visit sanibelseaschool.org.

Night snorkel attendees also enjoyed the sunset views from the Sanibel Causeway islands. 

Night snorkel attendees also enjoyed the sunset views from the Sanibel Causeway islands. 

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