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Campers Have a Slurping Good Time at Sanibel Sea School’s Pipefish Week

Pipefish Week campers examined plankton (a favorite food of the pipefish) under a microscope. 

Pipefish Week campers examined plankton (a favorite food of the pipefish) under a microscope. 

Close relatives of the seahorse, pipefish are good at things like blending in among the seagrass blades, slurping up food with their long, fused jaws, and adapting to salty surroundings. Campers enrolled in Suck It Up, Pipefish Week at Sanibel Sea School spent the week studying these somewhat strange, definitely fascinating creatures.

Seining for pipefish in the seagrass bed was a favorite activity among participants. 

Seining for pipefish in the seagrass bed was a favorite activity among participants. 

Like seahorses, pipefish have narrow, toothless mouths, so participants practiced slurping up food through straws during a Jello-slurping relay race. Campers also seined for pipefish in their natural habitiat, the seagrass bed, and played camouflage games to understand just how talented pipefish are when it comes to hiding from their predators.

Campers showed their team spirit with face paint in their surfboard paddling team colors. 

Campers showed their team spirit with face paint in their surfboard paddling team colors. 

Other activites included making seagrass art, a pipefish scavenger hunt, and an exciting courtship dance battle, since pipefish perform elaborate courtship rituals. As usual, there was also plenty of time for knot-tying, surfboard paddling, and making new friends.

Nine-armed sea stars made a guest appearance during Pipefish Week. 

Nine-armed sea stars made a guest appearance during Pipefish Week. 

Sanibel Sea School is a 501c3 nonprofit whose mission is to improve the ocean’s future, one person at a time. To learn more, visit sanibelseaschool.org. 

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Sanibel Sea School’s Coral Reef Week Campers Explore the Florida Keys

Campers departed the campground for a snorkeling trip to Looe Key Reef. 

Campers departed the campground for a snorkeling trip to Looe Key Reef. 

Twenty-five campers ages 11-12 recently spent a week exploring coral reefs on Big Pine Key. Led by Sanibel Sea School’s team of marine educators, they snorkeled in a variety of underwater habitats, practiced skills like cast netting and knot tying, and slept in tents underneath the stars.

Coralline algae provides habitat for thousands of invertebrates. During a lab, campers tried to identify as many species as possible. 

Coralline algae provides habitat for thousands of invertebrates. During a lab, campers tried to identify as many species as possible. 

After setting up camp at Big Pine Key Fishing Lodge and Campground, the group made daily boat trips to Looe Key Reef to observe life on a coral reef. It was a first for many, and participants were able to see nurse sharks, blacktip reef sharks, goliath groupers, brightly colored reef fish, live shells, and more. Other snorkeling destinations included the Big Pine Key Bridge, which is home to large tarpon, The Blue Hole, where Cassiopeia are abundant, Bahia Honda State Park, and the “Deep Blue”, where campers had a chance to float in 450 feet of water.

Snorkeling in the "Deep Blue", where the ocean is 450 feet deep, was a favorite activity among participants. 

Snorkeling in the "Deep Blue", where the ocean is 450 feet deep, was a favorite activity among participants. 

Each day, counselors led a scientific lab to more deeply explore different aspects of coral reef biology. Topics included sea urchin embryology, goniolithon (coralline algae), and sponge anatomy. “Our goniolithon lab is always a favorite among campers,” said group leader Johnny Rader. “They are able to break apart pieces of coralline algae to see what is living inside, and often find bristle worms, brittle stars, crabs, and flatworms. It is amazing how much life can exist on one small piece of algae.”

Taking a break. 

Taking a break. 

Other trip highlights included a visit to the Turtle Hospital to learn about sea turtle rehabilitation, eating delicious camp food, and evening activities like night snorkeling and dance contests. Participants returned to Sanibel happy, tired, and with many new stories to share with family and friends.

Camping with a view. 

Camping with a view. 

Sanibel Sea School is a 501c3 nonprofit whose mission is to improve the ocean’s future, one person at a time. To learn more, visit sanibelseaschool.org. 

Click here to view additional Coral Reef Week photos.

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Sanibel Sea School to Partner with Road Scholar

Participants in an intergenerational travel program will learn about Sanibel's fascinating creatures and ecosystems. 

Participants in an intergenerational travel program will learn about Sanibel's fascinating creatures and ecosystems. 

During July and August, Sanibel Sea School will partner with Road Scholar, an educational travel company, to host grandparents and their grandchildren for six days of intergenerational exploration and learning. 

Participants will stay at Sundial Beach Resort & Spa, where Sanibel Sea School operates a satellite campus, and will visit Sanibel’s unique beaches, mangrove forests, and seagrass beds led by the nonprofit’s team of knowledgeable marine educators. Activities will include snorkeling, seining, a squid dissection, and more.  

“We are honored to work with such a well-respected organization,” said Dr. Bruce Neill, Sanibel Sea School’s Executive Director. “Road Scholar is dedicated to inspiring and providing lifelong learning opportunities, which is perfectly aligned with our own approach to ocean education. It is a beautiful thing when two generations can experience the ocean’s magic together.” 

Sanibel Sea School, a 501c3 nonprofit whose mission is to improve the ocean’s future, one person at a time, also has plans to offer a retreat for active adults with Road Scholar in Fall 2017. To learn more, visit sanibelseaschool.org and roadscholar.org.

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Mighty Calusa Week Campers Treated to a Night Snorkel

Doc Bruce watched over night snorkelers from his stand up paddleboard. 

Doc Bruce watched over night snorkelers from his stand up paddleboard. 

Sanibel Sea School’s Mighty Calusa Week campers celebrated the history and culture of Southwest Florida’s Calusa Indians. In addition to canoeing, fishing, and building tools like the Calusa might have, participants showed their Sanibel spirit in the Fourth of July parade and were invited to attend a night snorkel.

Snorkelers found shrimp, juvenile crabs, and more. 

Snorkelers found shrimp, juvenile crabs, and more. 

The ocean becomes a different place at night, and it’s amazing what you can find with an underwater flashlight and a snorkel mask after dark. Campers met on the Sanibel Causeway at sunset and ventured into the seagrass beds with their counselors in search of nocturnal sea creatures.

Mighty Calusa Week Campers seined for fish like the Calusa Indians.

Mighty Calusa Week Campers seined for fish like the Calusa Indians.

“Campers are usually a little bit nervous at first, but they quickly realize how much there is to see and forget about their fears,” said Nicole Finnicum, the organization’s Director of Education. “This week, night snorkelers found shrimp, hermit crabs, juvenile blue crabs, pin fish, and mojarra.” Some of the snorkelers were also able to observe bioluminescence, which is the production of light by living organisms.

We ended the week with an exciting surf paddling race.

We ended the week with an exciting surf paddling race.

As usual, participants also surfed, created ocean art using natural materials, and made plenty of new friends. Sanibel Sea School is a 501c3 nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the ocean’s future, one person at a time. To learn more, visit sanibelseaschool.org.

Night snorkel attendees also enjoyed the sunset views from the Sanibel Causeway islands. 

Night snorkel attendees also enjoyed the sunset views from the Sanibel Causeway islands. 

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Sanibel Sea School Campers Dive in to the World of Sharks

Nurse Shark in the Dark Week campers looked for sharks while canoeing in San Carlos Bay. 

Nurse Shark in the Dark Week campers looked for sharks while canoeing in San Carlos Bay. 

Sharks were in the spotlight at Sanibel Sea School during the last week of June. The nonprofit organization hosted Shark of a Whale Week at its flagship campus on Periwinkle Way, and Nurse Shark in the Dark Week at Canterbury School in Fort Myers.

Campers dissected a shark during Shark of a Whale Week.

Campers dissected a shark during Shark of a Whale Week.

Shark of a Whale Week campers learned about the largest fish in the sea, the whale shark, a gentle, filter-feeding behemoth that knows a thing or two about camouflage. Participants conducted a plankton tow to take a closer look at the whale shark’s favorite food, built a whale shark sand sculpture to put the creature’s massive size in perspective, and played a game of blob tag to understand the challenges of being so large. They also dissected a small shark to study shark anatomy, and tried to camouflage themselves while snorkeling in the bay.

A whale shark sand sculpture showed participants just how large these fish can be. 

A whale shark sand sculpture showed participants just how large these fish can be. 

Nurse Shark in the Dark Week was all about these bottom-dwelling sharks that like to hide out under ledges and are able to locate prey in dark, mucky waters. Campers canoed in search of sharks on the sea floor, attempted to locate objects underwater using senses other than sight, and slurped up various foods to learn what eating must be like for a small-jawed nurse shark. Participants were also treated to a night snorkel near the Sanibel Causeway, and had a great time swimming in the dark.  

As usual, there was also time each week for surfing, art projects, and making new friends. Sanibel Sea School is a 501c3 nonprofit whose mission is to improve the ocean’s future, one person at a time. To learn more, visit sanibelseaschool.org.

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Young Women Achieve Ocean Warrior Status at Sanibel Sea School

Wahine Toa campers went for a paddle in the Sanibel canals. 

Wahine Toa campers went for a paddle in the Sanibel canals. 

Eleven young women between the ages of 13 and 15 recently joined Sanibel Sea School for Wahine Toa Week, an all-female stand up paddleboarding and survival camp. In the Hawaiian language, Wahine Toa means “fierce female ocean warrior”, and participants proved that they were more than worthy of the title by completing challenging paddling courses, practicing urban and wilderness survival skills, and camping overnight on an uninhabited island.

Beru Pierce practiced changing a tire.

Beru Pierce practiced changing a tire.

Female counselors taught practical skills like first aid, how to change a tire, and how to jumpstart a vehicle. Campers also learned how to build sturdy shelters, start a fire, tie useful knots, and how to rescue a fellow paddler in need of assistance. “When we were first planning our paddling and survival camps, some of our female staff members expressed frustration over the need to call their dads, brothers, or boyfriends for pretty basic help,” said program leader Spencer Richardson. “We are all very capable, but nobody had ever taught us simple skills like how to take care of a vehicle, or how to tie up a boat properly. We thought it would be great to offer an opportunity for girls to learn these things from older women who had already figured them out. That’s really how the idea for Wahine Toa was born.”

Campers posed for a photo while taking a break from learning the basics of vehicle maintenance. 

Campers posed for a photo while taking a break from learning the basics of vehicle maintenance. 

After plenty of paddling practice on San Carlos Bay and in the Sanibel canals, the group set out for Picnic Island on Thursday afternoon to test their new skills during a primitive campout. With only one sheet and a military-style meal-ready-to-eat (MRE) per person, they slept on top of their paddleboards under the stars. There was plenty of time to reflect on the week, enjoy the sounds of nature, and bond with fellow campers. Participants returned to the Sanibel Causeway the next morning for coffee and snacks before beginning one final, epic paddle to Fort Myers Beach. Upon arrival at Doc Fords, they were treated to lunch and a celebration of their new status as Wahine Toa.

San Carlos Bay provided calm waters and beautiful views. 

San Carlos Bay provided calm waters and beautiful views. 

Congratulations to Addy Rundqwist, Amy Walker, Beru Pierce, Elizabeth McCaffrey, Ella Stroud, Hannah Saunders, Isabelle Gosselin, Katherine McCaffrey, Kira Zautcke, Madelyn Mauro, and Samantha Sette. Sanibel Sea School is a 501c3 nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the ocean’s future, one person at a time. To learn more about Wahine Toa and other programs, visit sanibelseaschool.org. 

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Sanibel Sea School Alumna Update: Catching up with Shaniqua Gladney

Shaniqua Gladney teaching a class about dolphins at South Seas Island Resort in July 2011. 

Shaniqua Gladney teaching a class about dolphins at South Seas Island Resort in July 2011. 

At Sanibel Sea School, we strive to help students grow into capable, successful, innovative citizens who care deeply about the ocean. We start with our four year olds, when we teach them about kindness and self sufficiency at Cuddlefish Camp (think putting on your own water shoes, then helping a friend!). But the goal applies to students of all ages, including the college aged ones who often join us as camp counselors and marine educators during the summer months. We're proud to be building and encouraging a tribe of smart, driven Ocean Ambassadors like Shaniqua Gladney, who worked with us in 2011 and 2013 as a Baltimore Aquarium Henry Hall Intern. Shaniqua is now pursuing a Ph.D. in biological oceanography at the University of South Florida, and has a long-term vision to make marine research more accessible to high school students. We sat down with her to talk about the ocean, Sanibel Sea School memories, and what she hopes to accomplish in the future. 

You grew up in Baltimore. How did you become interested in the ocean and marine biology? 
I participated in the Henry Hall Program at the National Aquarium in Baltimore from sixth grade until I graduated from high school. It's a summer program that gives public school students an opportunity to explore different marine environments, visit research stations, and participate in ocean conservation projects, and it's what made me realize that marine science would be a part of my life forever.

What led you to Sanibel Sea School? 
As an undergraduate, an adviser told me that internships were important. I didn’t know exactly how to find one, but I knew I could reach out to the Baltimore Aquarium and they would point me in the right direction. As it turned out, they were in their second year of partnering with Sanibel Sea School for the Henry Hall Internship Program. I applied and ended up working for the Sea School for two summers - in 2011 and 2013. I was a marine science instructor intern, splitting my time between Sanibel and Captiva.  

Do any memories from Sanibel Sea School stand out as meaningful to you? 
I spent one of my Saturdays with a group of minority students, who were in an alternative school program for at-risk girls. They lived so close to the beach but hardly ever got to see it, and they were so excited to explore an unfamiliar environment. From that day on, I knew that one day I wanted to start a research organization to allow students from all backgrounds to experience marine science research well before college.

Now you are a Ph.D. student. Tell us about that. 
I'm a first-year Ph.D. student at the University of South Florida, studying biological oceanography. Right now, it is important for me to focus on my core courses, but the plan for this summer is to start narrowing down a specific research topic. My hope is to become a part of the red tide study group and develop some research questions around the toxicity of Karenia brevis. I might decide to include an education and outreach component in my dissertation as well. 

What are your eventual career goals? 
My big, long-term goal is to start a research organization for students to receive research experience in the marine science field prior to pursuing higher education. Shorter term, I’m hoping to either land a research job in a government agency, such as NOAA or FWS, or to stay in academia. 

What do you think is the most amazing thing about the ocean? 
That it connects all of the Earth sciences and allows us to study Earth’s history and climate through many of the proxies from biological, chemical, physical, and geological processes. 

What do you think is the most important ocean conservation issue for people to know about in 2017? 
Climate change. Although we are still trying to figure out some of the details of climate change, we know that Earth’s climate is warming. The carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere are higher than ever, and are continuing to rise. Due the vast majority of the global population being coastal, we should be worried about sea level rise as the ice caps melt. Ocean acidification will also cause problems for the ocean and its creatures as a result of climate change. We should all learn how to make changes in our everyday lives to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. 

What do you think is the most effective way to inspire people to become ocean advocates? 
Through effective communication. As scientists, we sometimes get so wrapped up in the details of our research that we forget about the other people who can get involved in creating healthier oceans. When we can communicate our science clearly, people will become more trusting, and will gain a better understanding of what we do and why we do it. 

What advice would you give young Sanibel Sea School students who want to study marine science someday? 
Follow your dreams. There is so little that we know about the ocean and the more students that study marine science, the more we will learn. 

Thank you, Shaniqua! 

 

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Paddle the Canals with Sanibel Sea School’s Ocean Tribe Paddling Club

Sanibel Sea School's Ocean Tribe Paddling Club will host a Sanibel Canal Paddle in July.

Sanibel Sea School's Ocean Tribe Paddling Club will host a Sanibel Canal Paddle in July.

Sanibel Sea School’s new Ocean Tribe Paddling Club organizes a meet-up each month for paddling enthusiasts to enjoy a relaxed paddle, share tips and ideas, and meet new friends to paddle with.

The July meet-up will be held on Tuesday, July 11th at 5:30 PM, and participants will paddle the Sanibel canals. “The canals are almost always calm, and we will probably spot some wildlife like manatees, dolphins, and birds along the way,” said marine educator and ACA-certified paddling instructor Spencer Richardson, who plans and leads the monthly events.

Those interested in joining the paddle should bring their own paddling equipment (kayaks, canoes, stand up paddleboards and other paddle-powered vessels are all welcome). The group will leave from the Sanibel Boat Ramp, where parking is available for $4/ hour. 

Sanibel Sea School is a 501c3 nonprofit whose mission is to improve the ocean’s future, one person at a time. The organization also offers weekly guided paddling excursions for families and groups. To learn more, visitsanibelseaschool.org or call (239) 472-8585

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Sanibel Sea School Campers Explore Barnacles and Cuttlefish 

Sanibel Sea School campers sunk bottles to attract their own barnacle settlements during Stuck On You, Barnacle Week. 

Sanibel Sea School campers sunk bottles to attract their own barnacle settlements during Stuck On You, Barnacle Week. 

Campers in Sanibel Sea School’s Stuck On You, Barnacle Week and Un-Cuddly Cuttlefish Week spent last week learning about some of the ocean’s most unusual creatures. 

We discovered that the glue produced by barnacles is much stronger than man-made glue. 

We discovered that the glue produced by barnacles is much stronger than man-made glue. 

Barnacle Week was all about the curious crustaceans we find glued to our docks, boats, and sometimes even other creatures. Participants snorkeled to find out where barnacles settle and grow, and sunk bottles to attract their own barnacle colonies. They compared the strength of the glue produced by barnacles to the strength of various man-made glues, and learned that barnacle glue is pretty amazing stuff – scientists are even studying it to figure out how humans can use it as an adhesive in the future. The week also included relay races, obstacle courses, and a game of barnacle musical chairs. 

Cuttlefish Week campers played a game of charades on the beach. 

Cuttlefish Week campers played a game of charades on the beach. 

The Un-Cuddly Cuttlefish Week was especially for 4 to 6 year olds, and provided plenty of opportunities for tiny ocean explorers to get comfortable in the water. Campers played beach games to learn about camouflage and mimicry, and were amazed by how smart these large-brained animals are. They can even communicate through visual messages! Participants also explored the shallows along Sanibel’s causeway islands, tie-dyed t-shirts, and made their own handprint cuttlefish. 

Sometimes our tiniest campers prefer to surf in pairs. 

Sometimes our tiniest campers prefer to surf in pairs. 

As usual, there was plenty of time each day for surfing, bracelet making, and new friends. Sanibel Sea School is a 501c3 nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the ocean’s future, one person at a time. To learn more, visit sanibelseaschool.org.

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Campers Enjoy a Rainy Week at Sanibel Sea School

Campers used dip nets to search for swimming crabs at Bunche Beach. 

Campers used dip nets to search for swimming crabs at Bunche Beach. 

Rainy weather didn’t stop Sanibel Sea School campers from enjoying the ocean last week. The organization hosted Massive Manatee Week at its flagship campus on Sanibel’s east end, and Watch Me Swim, Crab Week at its Sundial Resort and Spa campus. 

Stormy weather provided some great surfing opportunities. 

Stormy weather provided some great surfing opportunities. 

Manatee Week participants braved the rain to learn all about these charming marine mammals. They painted their own “No Wake” signs to remind boaters to watch out for the slow-moving creatures, paddled canoes through manatee habitat, and played a game about buoyancy. Campers also made environmentally friendly soap to help reduce the amount of pollutants in our local waterways. 

Manatee Week participants canoed in search of the slow-moving marine mammals. 

Manatee Week participants canoed in search of the slow-moving marine mammals. 

At Sundial, swimming crabs were the topic of the week, and campers visited prime crab habitat to search for blue crabs, pass crabs, lady crabs, and speckled crabs. At Bunche Beach, they caught swimming crabs in their dip nets, and watched them use their swimmerets to move through the water. Back at Sundial, participants tried to swim like crabs and practiced molting during two very funny relay races. On a particularly stormy afternoon, they stayed inside to craft their own crabs using Plaster of Paris. 

Snorkeling is a favorite activity at Sanibel Sea School. 

Snorkeling is a favorite activity at Sanibel Sea School. 

As usual, campers also surfed, tied macramé bracelets, and made lots of new friends. Sanibel Sea School is a 501c3 nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the ocean’s future, one person at a time. To learn more, visit sanibelseaschool.org.

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Summer Camp is off to a Great Start at Sanibel Sea School

Camo Crabo week campers set crab traps in San Carlos Bay. 

Camo Crabo week campers set crab traps in San Carlos Bay. 

Summer break has officially started for Lee County Schools, which means it's time for summer camp at Sanibel Sea School. During the week of May 29th, the 501c3 nonprofit organization offered two non-residential, weekly camp programs – Camo Crabo Week at its Flagship Campus on Sanibel’s East End, and Mangrove Mud Week at Sundial Resort and Spa.

Campers show off their to-scale sand sculpture of a 12-foot Japanese spider crab. 

Campers show off their to-scale sand sculpture of a 12-foot Japanese spider crab. 

Camo Crabo Week participants spent the week learning about slow-moving, algae-wearing spider crabs. They set crab traps to learn how commercial fishermen catch crabs in our area, and had a chance to examine the crabs they caught up close. Campers also snorkeled in San Carlos Bay in search of spider crabs, since they often cling to rocks and other underwater structures, and played games to understand these crabs’ perspectives and feeding habits. Spider crabs have very poor vision and must rely on other senses to find food and navigate their world. A favorite activity was building a to-scale sand sculpture of the largest spider crab, the Japanese spider crab. Its leg span can be up to twelve feet!

Mud walks at Bunche Beach are always a favorite activity among campers. 

Mud walks at Bunche Beach are always a favorite activity among campers. 

During Mangrove Mud Week, campers visited Bunche Beach and Blind Pass to learn how to identify Sanibel’s four species of mangroves, which include black, white and red mangroves, along with the beloved buttonwood. They also snorkeled to better understand mangroves’ role in our barrier island ecosystem, looking for creatures that rely on these unique trees for habitat along the way. An osmosis experiment using potatoes and salt demonstrated how mangroves regulate the amount of salt in their system – an important adaptation in this coastal area. “We also collected mangrove propagules to create our own mangrove aquarium,” said counselor Nicole Funk. “We hope these kids will stop by to see the tank later in the summer, so they can observe how much our mangroves have grown!”

You are sure to see lots of mangrove inhabitants while snorkeling in San Carlos Bay. 

You are sure to see lots of mangrove inhabitants while snorkeling in San Carlos Bay. 

In addition to learning about our marine ecosystem and its creatures, camp participants surfed, created ocean art using natural materials, and made lots of new friends. A great time was had by all, and the summer camp season is off to a fantastic start. Sanibel Sea School’s mission is to improve the ocean’s future, one person at a time. To learn more and view photos from camp, visit sanibelseaschool.org

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Welcome, 2017 Counselors!

It's that time of year again! Summer camp starts on Monday, which means we have some friendly new faces in the building. Read on to meet our 2017 counselors. 


Kaity Seitz

Where are you from? 
I'm from Canal Winchester, Ohio (near Columbus).

Where do you go to school and what are you studying?
I am going into my sophomore year at Wittenberg University in Springfield, Ohio, where I am studying environmental and marine science.

Is there a camp activity or week that you're looking most forward to?
I'm super excited for the weeks when the 4-6 year olds come. I love little kids and I can't wait to get them pumped about the ocean!

What do you like to do during your time off? 
I spend most of my free time here kayaking. I have a couple of spots around the island that I can always count on to find some curious dolphins or manatees; it's a great way for me to relax after a long day of work.

Favorite sea creature?
Usually I would say a manatee or a dolphin, but I am reading a book about octopus right now and they are insanely fascinating! 

What's the best music for a weekend at the beach? 
You can't go wrong with a little Jimmy Buffet and Bob Marley at the beach. I'm also big into the Hamilton soundtrack right now, so I'd have to throw some of that in there.

If you could visit any marine ecosystem on the planet, where would you go? 
I would love to dive at the Great Barrier Reef in Australia.


Chris Pasion

Where are you from? 
Lebanon, Ohio

Where do you go to school and what are you studying?
I go to school at the University of Cincinnati where I study Biology and English.

Is there a camp activity or week that you're looking most forward to?
I am most excited for the surf races each Friday.

What do you like to do during your time off? 
I like to play guitar and collect records in my free time. I also love to fish.

Favorite sea creature?
My favorite sea creature is (currently) the whale shark. I also like manta rays and goliath grouper.

What's the best music for a weekend at the beach? 
The best music for the beach is Bob Marley and the Wailers.

If you could visit any marine ecosystem on the planet, where would you go? 
I would visit the Great Barrier Reef.


Nicole Funk

Where are you from?
Lexington, Kentucky

Where do you go to school and what are you studying?
I go to the University of Kentucky and just finished a semester of studying abroad in Quito, Ecuador. I study Natural Resources & Environmental Science with a minor in Spanish. 

Is there a camp activity or week that you're looking most forward to?
I am most looking forward to the week focused on the Calusa. I am really excited to learn more about the native people who used to live in this area!

What do you like to do during your time off? 
I love to sing, listen to music, go for walks, play guitar, read, cook, and of course, eat!

Favorite sea creature?
puffer fish 

What's the best music for a weekend at the beach?
I love R&B and recently started listening to a lot of reggaeton. I like R&B because it's laid-back and full of emotion, while reggaeton is fun and tropical-sounding. 

If you could visit any marine ecosystem on the planet, where would you go? 
I would visit the mangroves of Ecuador. I have only been to the mangroves here in Sanibel, but I would love to see some mangroves in another part of the world. 

Is there anything else you'd like to share about yourself?
I was born on Halloween and my best friend's name is Katherine. 


Rachel Tammone

Where are you from?
I am from Newburgh, New York. 

Where did you go to school and what did you study?
I graduated in May 2017 from the University of Miami with a BA in Marine Affairs and a BA in Ecosystem Science and Policy. 

Is there a camp activity or week that you're looking most forward to?
I am looking most forward to The Mighty Calusa week because it reminds me of my elementary school when we had a week dedicated to our local Indian tribe. 

What do you like to do during your time off? 
During my off time I like to read or go paddleboarding. 

Favorite sea creature?
My favorite sea creature is the manta ray. 

What's the best music for a weekend at the beach?
The best music for a weekend at the beach is something with a country vibe, like Zach Brown Band or Jimmy Buffet.  

If you could visit any marine ecosystem on the planet, where would you go? 
If I could visit any marine ecosystem on the planet I would like to go to the Arctic and see narwhals. 


Courtney Halle

Where are you from? 
I am originally from Boston, Massachusetts but now live in Fort Myers, Florida. 

Where do you go to school and what are you studying?
I am a student at the University of Virginia. Although I am undeclared, I am interested in environmental policy and global sustainability. 

Is there a camp activity or week that you're looking most forward to?
Each week is exciting and has something different to offer, but at the moment I am most excited for The Mighty Calusa Week. I’ve heard great things from campers and counselors, and I am looking forward to experiencing it! 

What do you like to do during your time off? 
I enjoy reading and relaxing by the pool. After a long day of camp, I also enjoy seeing my parents and spending quality time with my friends. 

Favorite sea creature?
Either a sea turtle or a dolphin, it is hard to choose just one! 

What's the best music for a weekend at the beach? 
A playlist with Jack Johnson and the Dave Matthews Band. 

If you could visit any marine ecosystem on the planet, where would you go? 
The Great Barrier Reef

Is there anything else you'd like to share about yourself?
I am so excited to meet all of the campers and have an awesome summer learning about the ocean and all it has to offer! 

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Clear Your Gear Releases New Educational Video

Sanibel Sea School is a founding member of Clear Your Gear, a collaborative effort among several Sanibel-based conservation organizations to reduce wildlife injuries caused by improperly discarded fishing gear. The group has released a new educational video, produced by Mark Meyers of TradeMarky Films, meant to encourage viewers to think about what happens to their fishing gear when they are finished with it. 

“This short, fun video helps people learn and remember what we can all do to preserve the safety and beauty of our waters,” said Dr. Heather Barron, Hospital Director at the Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife (CROW) and Clear Your Gear Steering Committee Member. Barron treats numerous wildlife injuries caused by fishing gear, and birds and sea turtles are common victims. Fortunately, there are a few easy steps that individuals can take to help solve this problem.

“We love that so many people enjoy fishing and other water-based activities in Southwest Florida, and we know that the majority of them care deeply about the health of our ecosystems. Clear Your Gear aims to provide friendly reminders and easy tips to help residents and visitors fish responsibly and protect our wildlife. This video is one example of how we are doing that,” she said.

The video is set to a cleverly re-written version of a popular Irish folk song, called Drunken Sailor, and features a variety of local characters and scenery. It is available for viewing on Clear Your Gear's Facebook Page, website, and YouTube page. The group chose a humorous approach to keep things lighthearted, and to ensure that the video would be appropriate for all ages. “We wanted to create something that would illustrate the seriousness of the problem, appeal to a broad audience, and make people laugh. Mark was able to help us make that happen successfully with his ideas and talent,” said Sanibel Sea School’s Leah Biery, who is also a member of the Clear Your Gear Committee.  

Clear Your Gear participating organizations include The City of Sanibel, CROW, The “Ding” Darling Wildlife Society, The J.N.“Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge, Monofilament Busters, Sanibel-Captiva Conservation Foundation, and Sanibel Sea School. The partnership is generously funded by grants from The West Coast Inland Navigation District, San-Cap Solutions to Avoid Red Tide, and The Sanibel-Captiva Fishing Club. Clear Your Gear would also like to thank the many volunteers who support this project for their hard work and dedication. To learn more, visit clearyourgear.org.

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Sanibel Sea School Receives Grant from Charitable Foundation of the Islands

Sanibel Sea School has been selected by the Charitable Foundation of the Islands (CFI) to receive a 2017-2018 Capacity Grant. This grant will make it possible for two of the organization’s management staff members to participate in advanced training opportunities this year, which will in turn increase the nonprofit’s capacity to carry out its programs successfully.

CFI’s mission is to help people in need on Sanibel and Captiva, to promote philanthropy, and to strengthen nonprofit organizations that will build a spirit of community for generations to come. They do this through the distribution of annually raised and permanently endowed funds.

The foundation’s Capacity-Building Initiative aims to help nonprofits accomplish work that requires time, energy, expertise, and innovative thinking beyond everyday operations. “Like many nonprofits, our budget does not include adequate funds to regularly provide our leadership team with development opportunities,” said Dr. Bruce Neill, Sanibel Sea School’s Executive Director. “CFI’s support will help our team move forward in a variety of ways, and is an example of what makes the Sanibel community so special.”

Sanibel Sea School is a 501(c)3 nonprofit whose mission is to improve the ocean’s future, one person at a time. Learn more at www.sanibelseaschool.org.

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Students from Orangewood Elementary Visit Sanibel Sea School

Students from Orangewood Elementary practiced using a seine net at Sanibel Sea School.

Students from Orangewood Elementary practiced using a seine net at Sanibel Sea School.

Groups of second graders from Orangewood Elementary, located in Fort Myers, visited Sanibel Sea School during the first week of May to participate in ocean learning and exploration. Throughout the day, students rotated through a variety of stations, each with its own educational component. This partnership was subsidized by Sanibel Sea School’s donor-supported scholarship fund, to ensure that cost would not prevent any individual from attending.

Surfing always brings a smile to students' faces. 

Surfing always brings a smile to students' faces. 

Stations included seining, where students had a chance to catch and release creatures from the seagrass flats while learning about the seagrass ecosystem, surfing, which was accompanied by a lesson on the physics of waves, and a squid dissection. “I was so impressed by the kids’ excitement and their willingness to participate and learn,” said Johnny Rader, a marine educator at Sanibel Sea School. “One of their teachers told me that many students in her class are immigrants from Haiti, and have literally never been to the beach in Florida. They have been looking forward to this experience for months.” He added that he hoped the experience was as meaningful for his students as sharing the day with them was for him.

Students showed off their squid ink shark tattoos after participating in a squid dissection. 

Students showed off their squid ink shark tattoos after participating in a squid dissection. 

“We are working with more and more Lee County Schools each year,” said Rader, “and we’re realizing how many kids in our area hardly ever get to interact with the sea. Public schools have very little funding for field trips, and I’m so grateful that our donors make it possible for this to happen. It really means the world to these kids.” Sanibel Sea School will also host students from Manatee Elementary, Rayma C. Page Elementary, Allen Park Elementary, Tanglewood Elementary, and Pine Island Elementary this spring.

Students searched for shells and tiny creatures using dip nets during a break. 

Students searched for shells and tiny creatures using dip nets during a break. 

Sanibel Sea School is a 501c3 nonprofit whose mission is to improve the ocean’s future, one person at a time. To learn more, visit sanibelseaschool.org.

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Sanibel Sea School to Open Ocean Tribe Outfitters

Sanibel Sea School's Ocean Tribe Outfitters will offer stand up paddleboards, kayaks, and a variety of clothing and accessories for ocean recreation. 

Sanibel Sea School's Ocean Tribe Outfitters will offer stand up paddleboards, kayaks, and a variety of clothing and accessories for ocean recreation. 

Sanibel Sea School, a 501c3 nonprofit organization offering unique, field-based educational experiences, is set to open a new retail space that will support its mission to improve the ocean’s future, one person at a time. The store will be called the Ocean Tribe Outfitters, and a San-Cap Chamber of Commerce Ribbon Cutting Ceremony will be held to celebrate the opening. 

The Ocean Tribe Outfitters will specialize in paddling gear, including kayaks, stand up paddleboards, and related accessories, as well as equipment and clothing for ocean recreation. The organization's team of marine educators spends thousands of hours in the field each year, and will be available to recommend their favorite products to customers. 

“Paddling, especially paddleboarding, is one of our favorite ways to explore the ocean at Sanibel Sea School, so making the sport more available to others was an easy choice for us,” said Executive Director Dr. Bruce Neill. All profits from the store will fund the nonprofit’s programs, including scholarships and ocean outreach programs for students in need. 

Community members and visitors are invited to attend the ribbon cutting event at 5 PM on Wednesday, May 31st at 455 Periwinkle Way. Light refreshments and hors d’oeuvres will be served, and there will be a chance to win a variety of prizes for children and adults. To learn more or RSVP, please visit sanibelseaschool.org or call (239) 472-8585

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What's SUP, Spencer?

Stand Up Paddleboarding is a great way for families with older children to experience Southwest Florida's marine habitats. 

Stand Up Paddleboarding is a great way for families with older children to experience Southwest Florida's marine habitats. 

Sanibel Sea School recently added regularly scheduled Stand Up Paddleboard-based ocean adventures to its list of programs. We're excited to share the news that we now offer Discover Paddling classes and private guided paddling for families and groups on Sanibel. We're also an authorized dealer for BOTE, Body Glove, and Kialoa boards and accessories. 

All of our SUP programs are led by Spencer Richardson, an ACA-certified SUP instructor with a degree in biology and a broad knowledge of our local flora and fauna. We sat down with her to talk about these new opportunities for ocean exploration. 

You paddle almost every day. What makes paddleboarding a great way to explore the ocean, compared to other activities like boating or kayaking?

Stand up paddleboarding is one of my favorite ways to explore the ocean because it allows you a far line of sight and an incredible view of the water below. It's also great exercise, and it's quiet enough that you do not disturb wildlife, which sometimes happens in a boat. 

What is Discover Paddling, exactly? 

Our Discover Paddling class is a great introduction to SUP, and a perfect way for those with paddling experience to discover new areas of Southwest Florida. For this class, we meet at Bunche Beach, which is right over the bridge. We start with a short paddling lesson, covering the basic skills needed for a successful paddle, then we take a trip through some of my favorite marine habitats and talk about what we see from a biological perspective.

This type of outing can also be arranged just for your family or group, and we can tailor the lesson to your interests and abilities. 

Addy Rundqwist paddles on San Carlos Bay. 

Addy Rundqwist paddles on San Carlos Bay. 

Who are these paddling programs designed for? 

All of our guided paddling programs are open to participants 18 and up. Children who are 13 or older may join if they are accompanied by a parent or guardian. Paddling is the perfect activity for families with older children. It's a unique, fun way to spend a day on the water.

Is paddling difficult? 

No. Paddling is easy in SW Florida because of our calm waters. It only takes a few minutes to learn, and then we can set out for our adventure. 

If someone has paddled before, will a lesson really help them improve? 

Yes, you can always improve your technique and form, and there are some surprisingly simple ways to make your paddling more efficient. 

Sanibel Sea School sells SUP boards and accessories at its Flagship Campus on Sanibel. 

Sanibel Sea School sells SUP boards and accessories at its Flagship Campus on Sanibel. 

Where do Sanibel Sea School's paddling programs take place, and what kind of habitats can participants expect to see? 

Our paddling classes take place in San Carlos Bay and Rock Creek, which is by Bunche Beach. In my opinion, Bunch Beach is one of the best paddling destinations in Florida. We explore mangrove forests, mud flats, and the sandy waters around sea grass beds. These habitats are teeming with life and are very important to our local ecosystem as a whole. 

What are some of the creatures you see often while out paddling? 

One of the great things about nature is that it's full of surprises, so we never know exactly what to expect. However, we do usually get to see lots of sea and shore birds, mangrove crabs, and some great fish. I've also come across manatees, dolphins, stingrays, and a variety of interesting creatures on the mud flats and sandbars. 

What equipment is necessary enjoy paddleboarding? 

SUP gear is simple. You will need a board, a paddle, a board leash, a personal floatation device (PFD), and a whistle. It is always important to wear some sun protection while you are out paddling, so don't forget your hat, sunglasses and sun screen. 

What are some other places in our area that paddlers can explore by SUP, besides Sanibel?

If I feel like taking a paddling day trip, I go to the Estero River or the Imperial river. They are beautiful winding rivers that give you an idea of how old Florida looked. 

Thank you, Spencer! 

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To learn more or schedule your paddling adventure, please visit sanibelseaschool.org or call (239) 472-8585. Spencer is also available to answer questions directly via email at spencer@sanibelseaschool.org.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Sanibel Sea School Receives TripAdvisor Award

Dr. Bruce Neill, Sanibel Sea School's Executive Director, and marine educator Spencer Richardson pose for a photo with the nonprofit's TripAdvisor award. 

Dr. Bruce Neill, Sanibel Sea School's Executive Director, and marine educator Spencer Richardson pose for a photo with the nonprofit's TripAdvisor award. 

Sanibel Sea School was recently awarded first place in its TripAdvisor category for Sanibel Island. Listed under Classes and Workshops, the 501c3 nonprofit organization currently has 218 five-star reviews from past clients, and its educational ocean experiences for kids and families are a favorite activity among visitors to our area. TripAdvisor provided Sanibel Sea School with an engraved plaque to commemorate the occasion. 

“The Sanibel Sea School is an awesome place for experiential learning for people of all ages. Our whole family enjoys the shell walks, and our two sons love going to the kids’ classes,” wrote one reviewer. “The instructors have all been super knowledgeable as well as friendly and fun. This school is a special place, and we are so fortunate to have it here on the island. It truly is a world-class place to learn about ecology.” Many TripAdvisor reviewers also commented on summer camps, and wrote about the memorable, field-based experiences their families enjoyed together at Sanibel Sea School. Seining for seahorses, surfing, and the organization’s private land and boat-based programs were mentioned frequently as highlights. 

"We're so grateful for every single review our clients have written for us," said Executive Director Dr. Bruce Neill. "I am very proud of our team for going above and beyond to make sure every student has an outstanding, meaningful experience." Sanibel Sea School's mission is to improve the ocean's future, one person at a time. The organization offers a variety of field-based programs for children, families, and adults to choose from throughout the year. Visit sanibelseaschool.org to learn more and view the current schedule. 

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Sanibel Sea School’s Octifest a Fundraising Success

Sanibel Sea School's annual fundraiser, Octifest, is held under a tent on Sanibel's Causeway Island A. 

Sanibel Sea School's annual fundraiser, Octifest, is held under a tent on Sanibel's Causeway Island A. 

Sanibel Sea School’s annual fundraiser, Octifest, was held Saturday, April 8th in a big top tent on Causeway Island A. The event was attended by more than 200 guests, and raised funds that will support ocean outreach programs, provide scholarships to students in need, and help the 501c3 non-profit organization purchase important equipment for its field-based classes and camps.

Funds raised at Octifest make it possible for students from schools like Manatee Elementary to attend Sanibel Sea School's programs.

Funds raised at Octifest make it possible for students from schools like Manatee Elementary to attend Sanibel Sea School's programs.

“We are so thankful to be supported by such a generous community,” said the Sea School’s Development Director, Chrissy Basturk. “It’s wonderful to live in a place where people are passionate about taking care of the ocean and making meaningful learning experiences available to everyone.”  This year’s event raised more than $245,000, a 15% increase over last year, which will make it possible for Sanibel Sea School to grant additional scholarships and provide ocean education to even more kids in 2017. 

Deb Szymanczyk, Kyle and Christine Szymanczyk, Mary Lou Bailey, and Renata and Patrick Bailey support ocean education for all at Octifest 2017. 

Deb Szymanczyk, Kyle and Christine Szymanczyk, Mary Lou Bailey, and Renata and Patrick Bailey support ocean education for all at Octifest 2017. 

“We partner with a number of schools and partner non-profits throughout the year to offer learning opportunities to underprivileged children in our region,” said Basturk.  “We receive so many requests from teachers, parents, and others who want to join forces with us, and we make every effort to say yes. The money raised at Octifest is going to help us share the magic of the sea with lots of children this year.”

Guests at Octifest enjoyed sunset views. 

Guests at Octifest enjoyed sunset views. 

Sanibel Sea School’s educators have already started to deliver the good news to groups and individuals who have requested scholarships to attend the organization’s programs in the coming months. “I called one teacher last week to schedule a field trip for her class before the school year ends, and she couldn’t wait to tell her students,” said Director of Education Nicole Finnicum. “There are so many kids in our area who live close to the sea, but hardly ever get to learn about it in a hands-on way,” she added. Finnicum also said that she is looking forward to replacing broken and worn-out equipment like masks and snorkels, surfboards, and life jackets – all essential items for ocean exploration and enjoyment.

Sanibel Sea School is a 501c3 nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the ocean’s future, one person at a time. To learn more, visit sanibelseaschool.org and octifest.org

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Octifest on the Beach Supports Ocean Outreach

Students from the Pine Manor Improvement Association's Teen Program examine a tiny marine worm on a recent outing with Sanibel Sea School. 

Students from the Pine Manor Improvement Association's Teen Program examine a tiny marine worm on a recent outing with Sanibel Sea School. 

On Saturday, April 8th, Sanibel Sea School will once again host its annual fundraiser – Octifest on the Beach. Octifest will be held bayside, under a big-top tent on the Sanibel Causeway. Guests will enjoy a delicious and sustainable dinner, sunset views, stargazing, and a variety of opportunities to support the nonprofit organization’s mission to improve the ocean’s future, one person at a time. 

Funds raised at Octifest will help Sanibel Sea School purchase the equipment needed for its field-based ocean education programs, and will provide scholarships for thousands of local underprivileged children to explore the ocean each year. “We call our outreach groups our ‘landlocked’ kids,” said Chrissy Basturk, the school’s Development Director. “They live just a few miles from the coast, but many never visit the beach. If they do, there is not usually an opportunity for formal learning and discovery.” 

Sanibel Sea School’s partner groups include the PACE Center for Girls, the Pine Manor Improvement Association, Lee and Hendry County Schools, the Gladiolus Center for Learning and Development, the Heights Foundation, and hundreds of individual families that request financial support to attend camps and day programs each year. “We never turn anyone away because they are unable to pay for tuition,” said Basturk. “We believe that everyone should have equal access to ocean education, and our community is so generous in supporting us to make that happen.”

These kids wouldn’t have the ocean in their lives if it weren’t for our connection with Sanibel Sea School.
— Shari Clark, Resident Coordinator, Pine Manor Improvement Association

Shari Clark, Resident Coordinator for the Pine Manor Improvement Association, partners with Sanibel Sea School to bring participants in her teen program to Sanibel about once a month. “These kids wouldn't have the ocean in their lives if it weren't for our connection with Sanibel Sea School,” she said. “The field trips we take with Doc Bruce and his team of teachers give my group a new perspective on the vast world that exists beyond our neighborhood. It has helped them realize how much is out there to learn about and explore."

Sanibel Sea School is a 501c3 nonprofit whose vision is a world where all people value, understand, and care for the ocean. To learn more and purchase tickets to Octifest, visit octifest.org or call (239) 472-8585

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